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Electronic Gaming Monthly

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EGM logo.gif

Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM) was a United States based video game magazine. It released 13 issues a year and was published by Ziff-Davis. The first issue of Electronic Gaming Monthly came out in the summer of 1989, and the last came out in December, 2008. EGM stuck mainly to the standard video game mag fare of news, previews, and reviews of current gen games and consoles as well as current gen handhelds. Their staff when the magazine was cancelled included Dan "Shoe" Hsu (editor-in-chief), Mark Macdonald (executive editor), Jennifer Tsao (managing editor), Crispin Boyer (senior editor), Shane Bettenhausen (previews editor), Demian Linn (reviews editor), Bryan Intihar (news editor), and Shawn Elliot (associate editor).

As video game journalism goes, Electronic Gaming Monthly was actually one of the more respectable gaming mags (which isn't really saying much).

EGM loved April[edit | edit source]

Old EGM logo

The writers at EGM let their inner tricksters out and make fools of many of their readers on an annual basis. Their April Fool's pranks included the claim of a cheat which would allow one to view the luscious ladies of Dead or Alive Xtreme Beach Volleyball in the nude, and the prank which indicated that access to a realistic remake of the cell-shaded The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker would be given to anyone who would preorder the newest game in the Zelda series, now titled The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess (please add more April Fool's pranks). Though some of the fans of the magazine quickly accepted and sometimes revelled in the jokes, others have gotten quite upset about being made the fool of and threatened to end their subscription to the magazine. EGM's April Fool's pranks lasted as long as the magazine itself did, but the ex-EGM staffers will likely continue the tradition where they end up working.

The Death of EGM[edit | edit source]

In January, 2009, as part of the UGO buyout of 1UP.com from Ziff-Davis, EGM was cancelled, and many of the staff that worked on it were laid off.

See also[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]