Flying Shark

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Flying Shark
300px
Basic Information
Type(s)
Video Game
[[Toaplan]][[Category:Toaplan]]
[[Taito]][[Category:Taito]]
Scrolling shooter
Joystick; 2 buttons
Arcade, Amiga, Commodore 64, DOS, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, FM Towns and Nintendo Entertainment System
Main Credits
1987
[[Tatsuya Uemura]]
Awards | Changelog | Cheats | Codes | Codex
Compatibility | Covers | Credits | DLC | Help
Localization | Manifest | Patches | Ratings
Reviews | Screenshots | Soundtrack
Videos | Walkthrough


File:Flying Shark.png
Screenshot of Flying Shark

Flying Shark, known in Japan as Hi Sho Zame (飛翔鮫?), is a vertical scrolling shooter arcade game developed by Toaplan and published by Taito in 1987. Romstar released the game in the US as Sky Shark.

Piloting a bi-plane, the player takes out enemy land, air, and naval craft across various environments. Certain waves of enemy airplanes produce various bonuses when shot down, such as powerups, point bonuses, and extra lives. Each stage begins and ends at a runway, and every time the player lands at a runway beyond the first takeoff, the amount of bombs are multiplied by 3,000, and that total is added to your score; you return to 3 bombs at the start of each stage (or death).

According to the story of Batsugun, the bi-plane pilot's name is "Rom Schneider"; he was apparently put into a cryofreeze at the end of Flying Shark.



Legacy[edit | edit source]

Flying Shark was converted to the Amiga, Commodore 64, DOS, ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, FM Towns, and Nintendo Entertainment System.

This game received a sequel known as Fire Shark in 1989.


Music[edit | edit source]

The NES version of the game was Tim Follin's first composed soundtrack on the Nintendo Entertainment System.

External links[edit | edit source]

ja:飛翔鮫