Home Alone

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This article is about the 1991 game. For the 2006 game, see Home Alone (2006 video game).


Home Alone
HomeAlone1game.jpg
Basic Information
Type(s)
Video Game
Bethesda Softworks, Sega of America, Imagineering Inc.
THQ, Altron, Probe Entertainment
Action
4-megabit cartridge, 8-megabit cartridge, 16-megabit cartridge, floppy disk
SNES, Master System, Genesis, Game Gear, Amiga, MS-DOS, NES and Game Boy
Retail Features
Gameplay-Single-player.png
Play Information
1
European Union European Release Date(s)
Amiga
1991
Super Nintendo Entertainment System
January 11992
Genesis and Master System
1992
CanadaUnited StatesMexico North American Release Date(s)
MS-DOS
1991
Nintendo Entertainment System
October 1991
Game Boy
November 1991
Super Nintendo Entertainment System
December 1991
Genesis and Master System
1992
Japan Japanese Release Date(s)
Game Boy
June 261992
Super Famicom
August 111992
Awards | Changelog | Cheats | Codes | Codex
Compatibility | Covers | Credits | DLC | Help
Localization | Manifest | Modding | Patches
Ratings | Reviews | Screenshots | Soundtrack
Videos | Walkthrough

Home Alone is a video game created for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Master System, Sega Genesis, Sega Game Gear, Amiga, PC, Nintendo Entertainment System and the Game Boy and is based on the movie of the same name.

Gameplay[edit | edit source]

The purpose of the game is to escape the Wet Bandits while bringing all the McCallister's fortunes from the house down to the safe room in the basement. Once all items have been sent down the chute to the basement Kevin must make it past rats, bats, and ghosts he encounters in the basement, then fight the spider king so he can make it to the safe room to lock away all his families riches.


In the Home Alone game for the PC, the player must set up traps to hurt the Wet Bandits. In the Home Alone title for the NES, the player must avoid being caught by the Wet Bandits in 20 minutes. The game is an example of the trap-em-up genre, which also includes games like Heiankyo Alien, Space Panic, and Lode Runner.

Some official copies of the NES version have two different "game over" screens; one having Kevin McCallister performing his trademark screaming face with a speech balloon on his left side that reads "Oh no!", the other one only having a large cloud with "Oh no!" in the middle of it.

In the genesis version Playing as Kevin, you start off on his trusty sled, but the main job is to get to the house and make it burglar-proof. This involves setting traps throughout the house. Useful objects such as a Crossbow, Wire and Pepper can be combined to make fiendish weaponry.

20th Century Fox played a vital role in converting the movie into video game form. Still pictures of movie scenes are used, for example, in the portions of the game that are meant to tell the story about how the Wet Bandits plan to invade the house of a young boy whose family is on vacation in Europe.

Additional information[edit | edit source]

The game was dedicated to the memory of Tom Heidt, a programmer who died in 1992.

External links[edit | edit source]