Joe & Mac 2: Lost in the Tropics

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Joe & Mac 2: Lost in the Tropics
Joe & Mac 2 Box Art.jpg
Basic Information
Type(s)
Video Game
Action, Platform
Retail Features
Gameplay-Single-player.pngGameplay-Multi-player.png
European Union European Release Date(s)
November 1995
CanadaUnited StatesMexico North American Release Date(s)
April 1994
Japan Japanese Release Date(s)
February 181994
Awards | Changelog | Cheats | Codes | Codex
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Ratings | Reviews | Screenshots | Soundtrack
Videos | Walkthrough

Joe & Mac 2: Lost in the Tropics (released in Europe as Joe & Mac 3: Lost in the Tropics) is a Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game and a sequel to Joe & Mac. The object of the game is to defeat Neanderthals with two caveman ninja heroes along with dinosaurs and huge level bosses. Each player controls either Joe or Mac with limited lives and continues. If the player cannot defeat the game using those lives and continues, the game starts at the very beginning. Players can also choose to fall in love with a girlfriend in their Stone Age village; giving her flowers and meat as presents. Once the player gets married, he gets to father a child. Stone wheels are the official currency in the game and players can replay levels in order to get more stone wheels. An overhead view free roam map offers a chance for players to select their level like they were playing a console role-playing game. However, the action-packed levels themselves are in side view. Only one of the levels took place in a tropical environment; causing gamers to question the "Lost in the Tropics" in the title screen.

A caveman named Gork has stolen the crown belonging to the tribal chief of Kali Village, and it's up to the player to retrieve it by using the seven stones that he will receive in the story. Congo's Caper is a video game that plays similar to this release and was a prequel to this game in the European market.

The manufacturer's suggested retail price for the original Japanese was 8,500 yen (approximately $65 USD).