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Star Trek: Generations

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Star Trek: Generations
Basic Information
Type(s)
Video Game
Microprose
Microprose
Star Trek
Action, Adventure, Strategy, First-person Shooter
Mouse, Keyboard
Microsoft Windows
Retail Features
Gameplay-Single-player.png
CanadaUnited StatesMexico North American Release Date(s)
Microsoft Windows
1997
Awards | Changelog | Cheats | Codes | Codex
Compatibility | Covers | Credits | DLC | Help
Localization | Manifest | Modding | Patches
Ratings | Reviews | Screenshots | Soundtrack
Videos | Walkthrough

Star Trek Generations is a first-person shooter with adventure and strategy elements by Microprose, based on Star Trek Generations, the seventh film in the Star Trek film franchise.

Story[edit | edit source]

The plot follow the basic premise of the film that shares its name, but it deviates significantly.

Game storyline[edit | edit source]

Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise-D discover the ruins of the Amargosa Observatory and send Commander Riker down to investigate. Once there, he finds Dr. Tolian Soran, unbeknownst to them a scientist and madman hell-bent on returning to the Nexus, a dimensional plane that can only accessed via a strand of temporal energy that travels through the galaxy every 39.1 years.

After being transported aboard the U.S.S. Enterprise-D, Soran escapes, and begins to resume his goal of destroying the Amargosa star; Commander Riker is dispatched to the observatory, and ultimately has to prevent a solar probe, armed with trilithium, from destroying the Amargosa star. If the player fails, the Amargosa star collapses, destroying the observatory and rendering the system devoid of planets. The U.S.S. Enterprise-D then goes on various missions to try and find Soren. To achieve returning to the Nexus, Soran intends on destroying stars in order to cause the Nexus to pass through Veridian III. The player needs to guess which planets Soran intends to destroy in order to pursue him. If the player fails to prevent Soran from destroying a star system twice, the game is over.

In addition to being based on the film, the game is also a semi-sequel to Star Trek: The Next Generation - A Final Unity, since the non-canonical aliens from that game, the Chodak, make an appearance.

Deviations from the film[edit | edit source]

In the film, Soran succeeds in destroying the Amargosa star, and the U.S.S. Enterprise-D automatically calculates that they will find him at Veridian III. Soran is eventually stopped, but not before the Stardrive section of the ship is destroyed; the shockwave from the warp core breach disables the Saucer section, and it hurtles toward the planet, eventually coming to rest with relatively few casualties. In the game, Soran boards the Stardrive section and initiates a warp core breach; Commander Riker separates the Saucer section and it departs from the imminent breach. Soran then opens fire on the Saucer section, and it crashes to the planet.

Gameplay[edit | edit source]

The game tries to combine many computer game genres in one, not distancing from the main non-linear philosophy of alternate paths to complete the game that are followed in other Star Trek video games.

The majority of the game's strategic analysis occurs in Stellar Cartography (which also appears in the movie, although only for a few minutes) where the player plans their next move, the main opponents being time and Soran. This part of the game includes a strategic element where the player has to calculate and guess where Soran could be, in order to travel there and stop him before he destroys another star system.

The main action gameplay is when a crew member beams to a planet or space station, whereupon the game switches to first-person action/adventure. The main objective of every away mission is finding and engaging Soran, who beams away seconds before being killed by the player, sometimes leaving behind a mechanism to be disabled. The mission is then successful; however, not all away missions need to be successful to win the game.

Some enemy ships can also be encountered while in space. The game then switches to a space combat simulator where the player controls the U.S.S. Enterprise-D against the enemy ship(s). The fighting system is simplified and improved over the extremely difficult tactical part of A Final Unity.

External Links[edit | edit source]